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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> this is "world news." tonight, dangerous weapons. the u.s. warns the strongman of syria not to use the chemical weapons he has loaded, ready to go at an airfield. so, what will the u.s. do next? >>> made in america claims a kind of victory. apple announcing they will bring some jobs back from overseas. but is this the start of something even bigger? >>> hooked. the mom spending up to $200 a month of her virtual farm. and we'll show you other games which keep you coming back with a secret every six seconds. >>> and, the perfect gift made so easy. do you want to create this look under the christmas tree? >> oh, my god! >> scientists tonight give you the simple, amazing way to do it every time. >>> good evening. we begin with the worldwide reaction today to a dangerous move in syria. chemicals, dead lly gas loaded onto weapons near an airfield there. one drop could kill within minutes. so, world leaders are mobilizing tonight, deciding what they're going to do. and abc's senior foreign affairs correspondent martha raddatz takes us inside that story. >> reporter: today, hill
the internal energy agency. they predict the u.s. will be energy independent by 2030. and become the world's largest exporter of oil, surpassing counties like saudi arabia, venezuela, nigeria and even iran. solar, wind and a backyard oil boom has changed the global landscape, and the landscape on our own backyards. we saw it first-hand in kansas. new technologies unearthing previously untapped oil reserves there and across the u.s. the effects already being felt well beyond the gas pump. >> this unconventional revolution in oil and natural gas is already having a big impact on the united states. it has created something like 1.7 million jobs in the last few years. >> reporter: and consider this. the economists at moody's tell us, if gas prices drop another 50 cents this year, it will create another 350,000 jobs by this time next year. and in the next few months, pending no major disruptions, we could seal our grocery bills and the cost of medicines, many of them made out of petroleum, come down, too. >> sharyn alfonsi, thank you so much. >>> and now we turn to see, for the first time, the
that signals a whole new day for the u.s. barbara walters is here right now with what happened at the white house today. barbara? >> reporter: just a year ago this month, i met with president assad in damascus and i questioned him about the slaughter of his people. since then, 40,000 people have been killed. well, today, president obama had some big news. for the first time, he is putting the syrian opposition on the path to be recognized as the new government if and when assad falls. i'd like to talk about syria. do you plan to recognize the opposition and give them some legitimacy? >> we've made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, that we consider them the legitimate representative of the syrian people, in opposition to the assad regime, and so we will provide them recognition and obviously with that recognition comes the responsibilities on the part of that coalition. >> reporter: that's a big step. >> it is a big step. there is a small element of those who oppose the assad regime that
flu. >>> challenge on the u.s. fiscal crisis, the texas woman taking on washington and saying, if congress can't solve it, cut off their paychecks until they do. >>> and eyes wide shut. you will see our reporter behind the wheel, his eyes open, his brain asleep. an abc news experiment on drowsy drivers out cold, and they don't even know it. >>> good evening. we begin with that announcement out of england today that rocketed around the world. the future queen, kate middleton, expecting her first child, but she was rushed to the hospital, prince william by her side. abc's lama hasan is here. we talked with sources inside the palace, and she has the latest on what happened. lama. >> reporter: good evening, diane. well, the couple had been so tightly lipped about the pregnancy that some here at the palace the queen, prince charles and other members of the royal family reportedly only found out about it today. but when kate was hospitalized, the palace decided it was time to break the news to the world. the last time the world saw kate middleton was on friday, a picture of health p
and a cacophony of criticism. in a letter to the president today, u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice wrote, "the position of secretary of state should never be politicized. i am saddened that we have reached this point even before you have decided whom to nominate." and she shared the news on nbc. >> i didn't want to see a confirmation process that was very prolonged, very politicized, very distracting and very disruptive, because there are so many things we need to get done as a country. >> reporter: just weeks ago, rice, a tough and smart rising star in the obama administration, was the president's top choice to serve as the next secretary of state. but she drew a lightning storm of republican criticism for repeating talking points from the intelligence community that seemed to critics to downplay the terrorist attack on the diplomatic compound in benghazi, libya. >> what this began as was a spontaneous -- >> the concerns i have are greater today than they were before and we're not even close to getting basic answers. >> it is clear that the information that she gave the american p
a right to get married under the u.s. constitution? it will be a history-making decision, and surprisingly, it's an 83-year-old woman at the center of this case. and abc's expert on the supreme court, terry moran, is here right now. terry? >> reporter: well, diane, constitutionally, it doesn't get any bigger than this. the country's changed so much on this issue. the real question is, how much? and, like so many landmark cases, as you point out, this one begins with the story of one american. this case is going to go down in history as edie windsor versus the united states. edie windsor, 83 years old, is a widow now. but she had 42 happy years with the love of her life -- thea spyer. >> she was beautiful. she was smart as hell. and she was wonderful altogether. >> reporter: edie and thea were married but when thea died in 2009, edie got socked by the irs with $363,000 in estate taxes, which no widow in a straight marriage would have to pay. today, the supreme court decided to hear edie's case challenging the law she says discriminates against couples like her and thea. the defense of marri
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)